Science

 

The science program will prepare each student to become a knowledgeable citizen who is able to make informed decisions in a technological society.  All students will have the opportunity to study science in an interesting and worthwhile way that will open their minds to new outlooks and equip them with the intellectual skills that will guide their learning for the rest of their lives.

 

BIOLOGY

This class will introduce the students to the biology of the cell and the processes that take place on the cellular level.  It includes a survey of organisms in each of the five kingdoms, including their phylogeny. The application of biological content to real life situations is emphasized.  Laboratory experiences are included in this course.

TEXTBOOK: Biology, Dynamics of Life (Glencoe-McGraw Hill)

 

HONORS BIOLOGY

Honors Biology will cover much of the same information as Biology class, but some topics will be explored more thoroughly.  This class will introduce the students to the biology of the cell and the processes that take place on the cellular level.  It includes a survey of organisms in each of the five kingdoms, including their phylogeny.  The application of biological content to real life situations is emphasized.  They will move through some of the material at a quicker pace than the other classes.  Additional coursework may also be assigned.  Laboratory experiences are included in this course.

TEXTBOOK: Biology, Dynamics of Life (Glencoe-McGraw Hill)

 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY

This course provides students a general overview of biological science.  It includes an in-depth study of cellular processes, genetics, evolution, and ecology.  The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of the general Biology course usually taken during the first college year.  Laboratory experiments will be used to explore these topics further.

TEXTBOOK: Biology; Raven, Peter H. and Johnson, George B. 2002 Biology, 6th Edition (McGraw Hill)

 

CHEMISTRY

The course explores the experimental, conceptual, and mathematical aspects of chemistry.  It is designed to stimulate students’ interest in science and present the information and skills they need in today’s world.  The concepts are made easily accessible by developing them in a logical rather than a chronological fashion. The topics discussed include the metric system of measurements, matter and changes of matter, electron configurations, stoichiometry and gas laws.  Simple lab experiments are performed through the course.

TEXTBOOK: Merrill Chemistry (Glencoe-McGraw Hill)

 

CHEMISTRY HONORS  

This course is an in depth exploration of the subject of chemistry both in the conceptual and mathematical aspects.  The presentation emphasizes the fundamental concepts.  The approach is descriptive and works on the knowledge of the concepts and of the relationship of the concepts to one another.  The topics discussed include the metric system of measurements, matter and changes of matter, electron configurations, stoichiometry and gas laws.  Simple lab experiments are performed throughout the course.

TEXTBOOK: Merrill Chemistry (Glencoe-McGraw Hill)

 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY

This is an academic, quantitative chemistry course.  Chemistry is the study of atoms and molecules and how they interact according to physical laws.  Such study is applicable to everyday life.  Topics include the structure of matter, states of matter, reactions, descriptive chemistry, and chemical calculations.  All students are required to take the Advanced Placement examination in May and to pay the fee for the test.

TEXTBOOK: Principles of Chemistry (Silberberg)

 

PHYSICS

This course is designed to introduce physics to students with a wide range of backgrounds and abilities.  It shows how physics is related to their lives and the world around them.  The course offers a balance of conceptual development and quantitative applications covering motion, forces, thermodynamics, waves and electromagnetism.  Mathematics is the language of physics used in measurement and problem-solving techniques.  Laboratory experiments, calculators, and computers are central to students’ success in the course.

TEXTBOOK: Physics (Holt, Rinehart and Winston)

 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS

This course follows the Advanced Placement curriculum for Physics “B”.  It presents in-depth study foundations of Physics.  The mathematical techniques used in the course are algebra, geometry, and trigonometry, but not calculus.  The main objectives of the course are to provide the student with a clear and logical presentation of the basic concepts and principles of physics, and to strengthen an understanding of the concepts and principles through a broad range of applications to the real world.  The subject covers Newtonian mechanics and the mechanics of fluids, heat and thermodynamics, wave motion, sound and  optics, waves, electricity and magnetism, and, finally, an introduction to relativity, quantum physics and nuclear physics.  All students are required to take the Advanced Placement Examination in May and are required to pay the fee for the test.

TEXTBOOK: Physics (Holt, Rinehart & Winston)

 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

This course presents a comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the various systems in man.  It will also deal with embryological and fetal development, as well as human genetics.  Laboratory experiences are coordinated with the various topics.

TEXTBOOK: Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology (Prentice Hall)

 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

This course is designed to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative and sustainable solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.  This course will promote a love for God, self knowledge, service to others, and respect for all creation.  Students will be expected to complete laboratory experiments, case studies, and outside reading.  A research paper will be assigned.

 

FORENSIC SCIENCE

Students will learn the methodology needed to evaluate a crime scene, the proper lab mechanics needed to evaluate a crime scene, the proper lab mechanics needed to evaluate evidence, and how to compare between a known and unknown.  Students will learn how DNA, fingerprinting, and other forensic tests can be used to solve a crime.  The learning strategies used will include lecture, labs, research, activities, and videos.

TEXTBOOK: Introduction of Forensic Science & Criminalistics (McGraw Hill)

4 Reasons to Attend

Saint Mary's:

 

Academic Excellence

Spiritual Vitality

Leadership Training

Athletic Distinction

 

Saint Mary High School

Small     Personal     Catholic

Saint Mary High School

64 Chestnut St, Rutherford, NJ 07070

Phone: 201-933-5220 | Fax: 201-933-0834

© Copyright 2017 Saint Mary High School. All Rights Reserved.